Helmholtz Institut: Matter matters

Without large research infrastructures, modern science would lack a crucial basis.

Exploring the Arctic without a ship?
Measuring aircraft lift without a wind tunnel?
Analyzing the climate without satellites and monitoring stations?
And solving complex calculations without high-performance computers?
Impossible!

Without large research infrastructures, modern science would lack a crucial basis.

Every year, Helmholtz offers more than 10,000 scientists from over 30 countries access to its research infrastructures, thus making a decisive contribution to scientific and technological progress.

These facilities are constantly being improved and adapted to user needs.
To study matter, scientists rely on large, highly complex infrastructures. They accelerate particles in synchrotron and free electron laser facilities to almost the speed of light, send electrons on a slalom course or generate photons, ions or neutrons, which are then scattered on various materials.

Their goal?

To understand the matter surrounding us at a wide range of levels - from tiny elementary particles to gigantic structures in the universe. Many of the results in the field of matter lead to everyday applications, such as OLED displays for smartphones or improved early detection of tumors.

No matter what research infrastructure or experiment - they all have one thing in common: at the end of the day, scientists go home with a massive data package from which they can derive new knowledge or even decipher the secrets of our universe.